An analysis of the quotes from death of a salesman a play by arthur miller

Updated February 11, Willy Loman, the titular character in "Death of a Salesman," spent his whole life pursuing what he thought was the American Dream. But Willy's appeal is not for some abstraction of attention or dignity.

I don't say he's a great man. I'm vital in New England.

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He fought it out here, and this is where I'm gonna win it for him. But now Happy has the urge to try, to become something.

An analysis of the quotes from death of a salesman a play by arthur miller

So attention must be paid. I'm vital in New England. I'm a dime a dozen, and so are you! I don't say he's a great man. This leads to his obsession with seeds late in the play - it is too late to grow anything for his sons, but at least he can plant some vegetables, something that will outlast him and provide some use. Willie Loman never made a lot of money. The thesis of Linda's speech - and of Salesman as a whole - is that all men deserve respect and attention. I realized what a ridiculous lie my whole life has been. Linda, regarding Willy. After all the highways, and the trains, and the appointments, and the years, you end up worth more dead than alive. When he discovers that he isn't vital anywhere, his worldview crumbles. But now Happy has the urge to try, to become something. It's the only dream you can have - to come out number-one man.

He never earned enough to save anything, and he didn't build, and he didn't grow, and now that his job is done he has nothing left. Nothing's planted. I'm the New England man.

Death of a salesman biff quotes

I'm gonna show you and everybody else that Willy Loman did not die in vain. Although Willy is the first one to use this line, Ben repeats it many times throughout the play, making it clear that Ben is only a figment of Willy's imagination. But only great men, according to Willy, are truly well-liked - and that is what brings them success. It is this realization - along with the realization that he has a life insurance policy with a large premium - that drives him to suicide. He and his sons must be special. Nothing's planted. Biff, act II This is Biff coming to terms with the fact that his father's illusions of success for him were truly just illusions and nothing more. Willy's illusions about success impacted every part of his sons' lives. The man knew what he wanted and went out and got it!

Act I Willy's recipe for success is based entirely around a cult of personality. He's not the finest character that ever lived. It is this realization - along with the realization that he has a life insurance policy with a large premium - that drives him to suicide.

Death of a salesman quotes american dream

He had a good dream. Willy, Act II Biff has just cried that he is a dime a dozen, and so is his father. Willy's illusions about success impacted every part of his sons' lives. Willy, Act II Willy is bemoaning the worthlessness of all his years of work. Biff, act II This is Biff coming to terms with the fact that his father's illusions of success for him were truly just illusions and nothing more. Willy, act II Willy realizes that his whole career has built up to nothing. Attention, attention must finally be paid to such a person. Willy : I am not a dime a dozen! I realized what a ridiculous lie my whole life has been. He's not the finest character that ever lived. The man knew what he wanted and went out and got it!

His name was never in the paper. It's the only dream you can have - to come out number-one man.

Death of a salesman analysis

I am Willy Loman, and you are Biff Loman! Although Willy is the first one to use this line, Ben repeats it many times throughout the play, making it clear that Ben is only a figment of Willy's imagination. I don't say he's a great man. Act I This is the play's direct cry to human dignity. He's not the finest character that ever lived. But he's a human being, and a terrible thing is happening to him. I don't have a thing in the ground.
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SparkNotes: Death of a Salesman: Important Quotations Explained